Fane

In the very beginnings of the Theocracy it was hard for the religious folk who followed the Gods to understand or comprehend their guidance.

It was the Magister that changed this; teaching the Gods about their followers in ways that could be understood by both groups.

To the Theocracy a great gift was given, the Fane: An opaque glass orb which allows the Gods to talk to their followers.

Within Sarqand, in rooms next to the Archimandrite sits this most holy of objects. They alone have access, whilst not even the Heirophants from the Grand Circle of Faith are allowed within its presence.

When the time comes for the town of Gateway to once more open the portal to The Vale, the Fane is moved from its position accompanied by the Janissary Soldiers and the Chosen to its final resting place within the boundaries of the Northern Alliance camp.

The Presence of the Gods

Before The Vale; there were some stirrings with the Theocracy that the Gods were a creation of the establishment to keep order within the country.

Since The Vale; these stirrings have been replaced with religious fanaticism with a great many Priests and Initiates requesting to go to there to speak to the Gods themselves.

Some do not like what the find, and all whom have visited The Vale will tell you that the Fane was given to The Father, a fact he makes clear to those who would challenge it.

Within the Fane it is possible for a Priest or Initiate to perform ceremonies to the Gods to curry their favour. What were once called Rituals and Rites by the Theocracy have become known as Celebrations and Liturgies to remove their likeness to magical practises.

Celebration

Led by a priest with a congregation of worshippers, a celebration can be used to ask the gods, or a specific god, to look favourably on those gathered their. 

There need not be a reason for it, but after great victories is always a good time, especially if the destruction of undead has taken place.

The gods like to reward hard working faithful groups who give celebration to them with gifts, and stories of deeds.

Liturgy

A far more sombre and personal affair than a celebration, the liturgies are used most often by priests in quite contemplation of those that have recently passed to the light, or in dealing with matters of heresy, or law.

A liturgy is most often to one particular god.